Generating ideas, connections, and action

LLC Staff's blog

Developing Leadership that Contributes to Racial Equity

Our collective document is getting unwieldy, and in a good way. We want to allow for more generative contribution before working to integrate all of the comments and organize the content in more accessible ways. We continue to welcome comments on diagnostic questions, recommendations and resources, and we are getting great resources so please keep them coming. To add your comments or access this collective document, click here.

 

In addition, it would be helpful earlier in the document to describe what we are driving towards as the skills, ability, knowledge, practices and behaviors that we would expect to be present and observable in individuals and groups. In other words, what does racial equity compentency look like in practice. Answering this question if fundamental to understanding what it will take to help people and groups get there. We would love your help with this question in the document.

 

 read more »

LLC Webinar | Important Lessons for Cultivating Leadership of Color in Community Organizing

August 22, 2018

11:00 am Pacific - 12PM | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Eastern

 

 

Please join us for a conversation with Ericka Stallings from the Center for Neighborhood Leadership as she shares lessons from 10 years of experience about what makes an effective and transformative support model for developing indigenous community leadership. She will cover a lot of ground including learning from mistakes, intentional selection, working on real problems, putting in the time it takes, compensation, what it means to reclaim leadership and more. Her lessons are deeply rooted in the view that communities of color and other marginalized communities do not need external actors and have the wisdom and talents needed to take on complex problems with the appropriate supports. We hope you can join us for a thoughtful conversation that will help us to think differently about leadership development. If you would like to read a great blog post by Ericka in preparation for the webinar you can find it here.

 

Join The Team: Become LLC's Co-Executive Director

Job Title: Co-Executive Director

Reports to: LLC Board of Directors

FSLA Status: Exempt

To read more about why we are transforming our leadership development, read our LLC Executive Director's thoughts here. 
Apply here
People of color strongly encouraged to apply.
 

About the Leadership Learning Community (LLC):

LLC is a fiscally sponsored program of Community Initiatives, a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Leadership Learning Community is an 18-year- old national nonprofit organization transforming the way leadership development is understood, practiced and promoted, primarily within the nonprofit sector. We believe that the dominant leadership development model must be challenged in order to address the needs of all who lead and are invested in developing leadership!  By centering the experiences of folks most impacted by racism and inequity, we work towards transforming leadership development approaches and systems to reflect and create an equitable world by tapping into the potential of everyone seeking an opportunity to better society. We know that we need a meta-shift in how we understand and develop leadership if we are going to produces systems change. This means leading and learning together through equity-based, networked and collective leadership to innovate new interventions that challenge the dominant way of thinking about leadership development. We do this by making the case of more expansive understanding of leadership, by constantly exploring and working the edge of where practice can shift and by building the field. This in turn will create a just and equitable society.

 read more »

Six Lessons for Cultivating Leadership of Color in the Community Organizing Movement

By Ericka Stallings, ANHD's Director of Organizing and Advocacy

Non-profit organizing institutions have long struggled with the fact that their leadership is disproportionately white and middle class. We all know that our organizing will ultimately be more effective and more grounded in a true commitment to justice, if the primary actors are directly impacted people, those who come from the marginalized communities in which we work. Yet, for many reasons, groups in the Community Development movement too often fail to achieve this.

 

Cultivating movement leadership of color must include an effective approach for recognizing, attracting, and training new community organizers of color, then supporting them as they hone their skills to more advanced levels. But even here - or maybe, especially here - our movement falls short; we have seen that it is consistently difficult for people from marginalized communities to overcome the barriers to both entry and advancement in community organizing. Consequently, people of color and other marginalized people are grossly underrepresented in leadership positions . There are many reasons for this, including implicit bias and the glorification of mainstream career and educational backgrounds, both of which hinder the recognition of candidates from marginalized backgrounds. Consequently, our organizations often ignore or undervalue the critically important skills and experiences that directly-impacted leaders can bring to movement organizations.

 read more »

Action Learning Seed Fund's Community of Practice

By Susan Misra, CoDirector of Management of Assistance Group

Looking back over the last year of the Action Learning Seed Fund's community of practice, a major theme that surfaced was how to hold and wield the power of our full intersectional selves in racial healing and equity work. This is complex and exhausting work to name inequity and hold space for racial healing between different communities and within the same community.

Our group of eight people struggle with patriarchy, sexism and misogyny among leadership within our communities, for instance. We work with these leaders to confront Islamophobia or xenophobia, to have courageous conversations with other communities, and to salve historic and current racial wounds. At the same time, we need to call these (often male-identified) leaders into sharing power and leadership with women and gender non-conforming people. This can be particularly challenging when there are formal gendered roles (e.g., in a religious institution).

 read more »

LLC Webinar | Leadership and Large Scale Change: Are We Setting Our Sites High Enough?

 

July 12, 2018

11:00 am Pacific - 12PM | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Eastern

 

People who are putting their time, energy and resources into supporting and cultivating leadership are for the most part doing the work to advance meaningful change and social justice. Our learning about this work is struggling to keep up with our change aspirations. It's not enough to know that participants believe they are better leaders without answering questions about the ways in which leadership development work is creating equity and contributing to concrete changes in the health, education, and wealth of all. This webinar will share findings from a collaborative research efforts between leadership Funders and Evaluators to understand what we can achieve through leadership investments, how we can know, and what we are learning about the kind of leadership we need to contribute to greater equity.

 read more »

LLC Webinar Series | LeaderSpring in Reset: rethinking leadership and risk taking

May 16, 2018

11:00 am - 12:00 pm Pacific | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Eastern

 

Our thinking about leadership is evolving as is the world in which greater numbers of people are coming together to take actions that will create greater equity. To keep pace, those who are supporting leadership for racial equity and social justice must pause, reflect and reconsider our approaches to leadership development. Because most leadership programs receive positive feedback from those participating in them, it can be hard to try something different...who wants to mess with what works, even if the payoff could be more dramatic results. It takes courage to do this and we are excited to have our friends from LeaderSpring share their "reset" process and what they are learning. Please join our next webinar with Sonia Manjon, Ph.D and Safi Jiroh from LeaderSpring.

 read more »

Response to "Blind Spots (Part 2)" by Lisa Miller Mattsson

Dear Deborah,

 

Thanks so much for the powerful theme and the questions being raised by “Blind Spots: Are Leadership Development Programs Contributing to Greater Racial Equality or Inhibiting our Progress?”  Lots to think about!

 

I just wanted to share a thought regarding “worship of the written word” as a means of support for white supremacist culture.  It is definitely true that there are many valuable and powerful ways to communicate other than in writing. Personally, I believe effective oration to be more a powerful form of leadership communication than writing, as a general rule.  Even negative leaders know this, and use the spoken word to move people.  Hitler, the iconic example of white supremacist leadership, comes to mind.  He utilized the power of the spoken word as a means by which to stir and mobilize people.

 read more »

LLC Webinar Series | Practicing Network Governance and Structures

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 
10am Pacific |1pm Eastern

Join us as June Holley, Tracey Kunkler and Steve Waddell dive back into sharing the importance of Network Governance and Structures. We'll be learning how networks are experimenting with and co-creating innovative network governanceand structures that are self-organizing, encouraging and supporting the formation of collaborative circles.
 
Join us for 90 minutes of hands-on virtual practice! June will bring questions and you will be in practice breakout groups. Please plug in your webcams and have earphones ready to roll up your sleeves and practice with us!
 read more »
Syndicate content