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Reflections on Leadership and Love on the Occasion of My Marriage

In other posts on leadership where I mentioned love, I quickly offer the disclaimer that I am not talking about the ‘romantic kind of love.’ Well, today is different. On Sunday, July 24th, I married the love of my life after twenty-five years of being mostly single so I have had ample opportunity to think about love and this rather momentous occasion. And yes, not everything has to be about leadership but I couldn’t quite help myself.

A couple of weeks before the wedding a friend and former board member asked why we decided to get married instead of just continuing on as a solidly committed couple. I appreciated the opportunity for reflection, one that brought me back to a leadership value that is fundamental to the way I think about leadership and life, interdependence. We chose the ritual of marriage as a way to celebrate not only our union but the union of our communities as we brought people from all strands and times in our lives together as a full reflection and celebration of who we are as individuals, who we are together as a couple and who we are in community. I was so happy to be surrounded by people who brought us to this moment with their encouragement and support and who will carry us forward. We are capable of so much more together than alone. And it was a beautiful and sweet celebration of love. Love was in the air, in an infectious way that is kindled by weddings. One person hugged me and thanked me for the chance to step away for a moment from all that is hard in the world right now and to be lifted up by love. 

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GUEST BLOG | Solo Leadership: It's Time To Change The Story By Michelle Gislason

We need to break away from the traditional, Westernized story of the heroic leader toward a more expansive, sustainable, and community-oriented leadership approach. This is the premise of this piece by Senior Project Director Michelle Gislason, which takes readers on a journey starting with thoughts on our current political landscape and ending with how we can create change in our communities—with stops along the way to consider adaptive leadership, outdated power paradigms, and nonprofit leadership. Enjoy the ride!

 

I have been watching the recent election coverage with a combination of dismay and disillusionment. As someone who self-identifies as progressive and works for social justice, the majority of the candidates not only don't speak to me, they don't speak for me. Personal attacks, verbal attacks, racism. And this is just from the left. The leading candidate for president on the Republican side is a racist, misogynistic demagogue. Just, wow. How disheartening and enraging. The one candidate who has come close to speaking to me? Well, the irony is not lost on me that hope for a revolution has been claimed by a 70-year-old white man from Vermont.

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An Update : The Next Frontier For The Leadership Learning Community

It has been four months since LLC has gone virtual. As you may recall, at the end of March, LLC decided to give up our Oakland office and have our staff work from home. As promised, we thought now might be a good time to share what we have learned during this process.

 

The Scoop

 

Working remotely has had several advantages. As an organization, our overhead is much much lower, individually our daily commute time has significantly decreased,which means less time stressing over traffic. Though there are core hours we commit to daily, there are times when we each may need some flexibility and we are easily and smoothly able to transition between work and life. For example, when we were all able to walk to our voting sites for the primaries for a few minutes and return to work quickly without any added commute.

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Leadership, Time, and Mindfulness

Here is a sad confession. I meditate in fits and starts even though I know in my soul that it’s a good thing on so many levels, and for reasons that others writing for this column have articulated better than I can. To add to the irony, I think I can’t make time for meditation.  It reminds me of a story I heard relayed by Thich Nhat Hanh. He described arriving in Boston where he was picked up by a woman who had to stop on the way to get flyers and then on to a dry cleaning store to pick up something else and then a quick stop to pick up food for the event. Not an unfamiliar story for many of us.  He asked her about how she managed the pace of her activities. Her response was, “You don’t understand, if I did not run around like this I would never have any time for myself” and his response? “It’s all your time!”

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GUEST BLOG | The Key to Effective Learning? Soap Bubbles! By Eugene Kim

This article was first published on Eugene Kim's blog, Faster Than 2.0.This is part three of a three-part essay on facilitating group learning. Part two of a three-part essay on facilitating group learning. See also part one, Getting real about experiments and learning.” and two, "Documenting Is Not Learning."

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Two months ago, I blogged about my experiment with Dharmishta Rood and the Code for America Incubator, which wraps up in another few months. The goal is to help startups — in this case, a company called PostCode — develop great collaborative habits in its formative stage. The theory is that it’s more effective to build good habits from the start than it is to try to change bad habits later.

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Guest Blog | The Seminal Skill in Adaptive Leadership: The Work of Building Trust By Katherine Tyler Scott

In response to Deborah’s blog on Trust and Leadership, Katherine Tylor Scott shares this article. Originally published on the Ki Thought Bridge website.

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One of the first things we learn in life is whether and how to trust someone else. Our experience with our caregivers tell us whether we can be safe and secure in a dependent relationship, whether the environment is loving or hostile, open or closed to our discomfort, affirming or rejecting of who we are, and whether our basic survival needs will be met without fear. What we learn in these first relationships of trust-holding remain with us for all of our lives. They are the building blocks, the foundation for who we become. If we have not examined the origins of trust in our own lives we will be unaware of the influence they have on our behavior and the health of our relationships. We will be unconscious as to the effect these early formational experiences have on our leadership of others. We will be limited in our understanding of the  impact that trust in our lives will have on the individuals and groups we invite into the vulnerable and risky work of adaptive leadership.

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Questions From "Successfully Transitioning Your Organization to a Network Mindset" Webinar

Beth Tener and Carole Martin presented ways of transitioning our organizations into a network mindset. They presented applicable tools to transform any organization. They answered many questions live, however, here are a few more questions that they were able to dive deeper into. If you missed the webinar you can watch the recording and view the slides. Beth and Carole also share more resources in this blog.

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Networks and Leadership Webinar Series: Foundations as Network Leaders: Learning from One Foundation’s Journey and Results

           

Join us for the third session of the Networks and Leadership Webinar Series on "Foundations as Network Leaders: Learning From One Foundation's Journey and Results"

What does it mean for a foundation to become a facilitative leader?  And how can foundation staff make the case for network-based funding approaches to boards and other stakeholders?  This two-part series will explore successes and insights from the DentaQuest Foundation’s national systems change strategy Oral Health 2020.  Started in 2011, this network-based strategy has achieved notable results—development of oral health leaders across the country, creation of new state partnerships connected to a national health improvement network, and tangible system and policy changes such as the expansion of public benefits in more than 15 states.  Come learn about what it took to make this work happen from the perspective of Foundation leaders Brian Souza and Mike Monopoli, initiative evaluator Clare Nolan (Harder+Company Community Research), and network weaver Marianne Hughes (Interaction Institute for Social Change).

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