Generating ideas, connections, and action

social network analysis

Why Social Network Analysis?

In the new era of leadership, we have learned that collaboration and networked leadership models trumps individual models of heroic leadership. We’re wiser and capable of greater things together than apart. But how do we measure if we’re succeeding at collaboration? If we’ve created a healthy network? Or if we have gaps that we need to close in communication?


This is where social network analysis comes in. Social network analysis is a type of analysis that measure networks of people and helps evaluators determine how people are connecting and around what issues and projects. With social network analysis, you can take a snapshot of the network and figure out both the network strengths and weaknesses, and use that to grow a better and more robust network for a greater and more dramatic impact.

 read more »

Kansas Leadership Center: Social Network Analysis

Client: Kansas Leadership Center
Author: Deborah Meehan
Subject: social network analysis
Type of Service: Social Network Analysis
Date of Publication: 03/27/2013
Summary:

LLC Most Popular Newsletter Articles in 2012

1.  Applying Social Network Analysis to Online Communications Networks (By Claire Reinelt and Natalia Castaneda)

Looking to increase your reach and influence in the social media space? Social Network Analysis (SNA), a research methodology that focuses on “mapping and measuring relationships and flows between people, groups, organizations, computers, URLs, and other connected information/knowledge entities,” (Orgnet.com) may be the answer. We recently partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to explore how to effectively apply social network analysis to public health online communications strategies, how communications networks operate in Twitter and the blogosphere, and how to identify strategic and influential connections that can be nurtured over time to extend the reach of public health messaging. This was an innovative project that produced detailed and insightful information about how to use SNA to strategize communications campaigns, and we wanted to share some of these insights with the community – including specific recommendations for identifying key messages, influencers, and engagement strategies.

 read more »

Networking a City

In the summer 2012 issue of the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Marianne Hughes and Didi Goldenhar have written a case study on the Barr Fellows Network, entitled Networking a City.  It describes a seven year investment in seasoned nonprofit executive directors to reinvigorate their leadership and create environments for them to form authentic relationships with each other that spur innovation and transform Boston’s social sector to become more highly collaborative and mission-driven.  The assumption is that if diverse leaders in the social sector form authentic, trusting relationships, then they will find creative, innovative ways to tap their collective assets for greater social benefit.   read more »

Visualizing the Landscape of Action Networks: An Application of Social Network Analysis

NC_action_network_small.png

In our last newsletter we reported on how we applied social network analysis (SNA) to identify influencers in online public health communications networks.  This month we report on another application of SNA in our project with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to understand influence in state and local public health Action Networks.  Action Networks are clusters of organizations that have committed to work together to take action towards a shared vision.  For instance, Eat Smart Move More North Carolina is an “action network” with over 60 agencies, associations, and other partner organizations committed to increasing opportunities for healthy eating and physical activity, wherever people live, learn, earn, play, and pray in the State of North Carolina.  The success of Eat Smart Move More depends on hundreds of people, organizations, and communities doing their part to create the conditions for people to eat smarter and move more.    read more »

Applying Social Network Analysis to Online Communications Networks

RWJF Blog Influencer Map.jpg

By Claire Reinelt, Natalia Castaneda

 

Looking to increase your reach and influence in the social media space? Social Network Analysis (SNA), a research methodology that focuses on “mapping and measuring relationships and flows between people, groups, organizations, computers, URLs, and other connected information/knowledge entities,” (Orgnet.com) may be the answer. We recently partnered with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to explore how to effectively apply social network analysis to public health online communications strategies, how communications networks operate in Twitter and the blogosphere, and how to identify strategic and influential connections that can be nurtured over time to extend the reach of public health messaging. This was an innovative project that produced detailed and insightful information about how to use SNA to strategize communications campaigns, and we wanted to share some of these insights with the community – including specific recommendations for identifying key messages, influencers, and engagement strategies.

 read more »

Social Network Analysis for The Central Valley Health Policy Institute

Client: The Central Valley Health Policy Institute
Author: Deborah Meehan (LLC)
Subject: social network analysis
Type of Service: Network Development
Date of Publication: 11/07/2011
Summary:

Kellogg Fellows Leadership Alliance Social Network Analysis Project

Client: W. K. Kellogg Foundation
Author: Deborah Meehan (LLC)
Subject: social network analysis, alumni
Type of Service: Social Network Analysis
Date of Publication: 07/15/2011
Summary:

News Brief: Social Network Analysis, Network Governance, Informal Networks, Innovation, Diversity, Collaboration, Network Map

● “Ethics in Social Network Analysis”
    Author:  Eva Schiffer
    Date:  October 13, 2010
    Source:  Net-Map blog
    URL:  http://netmap.ifpriblog.org/2010/10/13/ethics-in-social-network-analysis/
Social Network Analysis:  Traditional surveys ensure that the respondents remain anonymous, as each respondent is simply meant to be representative of a particular demographic.  However, in using network tools to facilitate change,  the identity of each individual becomes key. This brings up an ethical issue involving social network analysis – should the respondents have it made very clear to them exactly how their answers will be analyzed?  The answer, for Eva Schiffer, is “yes.”  And not only is it the ethical thing to do, to provide full disclosure of the analysis methods, it is actually “one of the strengths of network mapping”; it allows interviewees to “reflect on the complete picture and see if that’s what they actually wanted to say.” 

 read more »

LLC Social Network Analysis Project Final Report Microsoft Word file [download] [more info]

LLC, through its Community Seed Fund, recently supported four members of the Community (Bruce Hoppe, Meredith Emmett, Dianne Russell, and Odin Zackman) to test the usefulness of this methodology in different network contexts. The team produced a very informative summary about the outcomes of this project. One of the more interesting findings was that network maps can be a valuable tool for generating group reflection about itself. The study raised the question about which networks would find this a valuable tool and which might not. There is some indication that those networks that have a clear purpose, are more bounded and formalized, and that have outside funding, may be more motivated and interested in using network maps to deepen their understanding of themselves as a network. Another interesting lesson learned is that the interpretation of network maps is full of complexities. There is no single interpretation of what the maps mean. This means that the maps can lead to many interesting conversations. The summary does a nice job of specifying and evaluating the outcomes of the three projects that were part of the study. It provides valuable guidance to others who may consider undertaking an SNA of their leadership networks. In addition, the report analyzes the three networks along 11 dimensions. These will be helpful to you if you are looking to better understand the networks you are part of regardless of whether you use SNA or not. While our understanding of networks is still very much evolving, SNA is a promising tool to help us "see" leadership networks.

Authors: Claire Reinelt

Subjects: social network analysis

07/23/2009 - 15:58 - 0 comments - 1 attachment - Posted by admin

Syndicate content