Generating ideas, connections, and action

leadership development

Leadership Development: Investing in Individuals PDF file [download] [more info]

Grant makers invest in leadership development for many different reasons. There are three broad categories of goals and benefits that grant makers are interested in when they support this work: Stronger and more effective leaders and organizations; Social change in a community, region, or field; and, Benefits for the grant maker’s own organization.

Authors: Deborah Meehan, Ellen Arrick

Subjects: leadership development, funders, grantcraft, guide, guides-tools-reports

09/27/2003 - 23:00 - 0 comments - 1 attachment - Posted by Elissa Perry

What Can Fog Teach Us About Living in a Disruptive World?

A guest Blog from Kathleen Allen, President of Kathleen Allen and Associates

Kathy Allen was an early LLC board member and source of inspiration in her ability to draw from the natural world to help us bring a more organic lens to the workings of leadership and organizational learning. She specializes in leadership coaching and organizational change across a variety of contexts, including collaborative networks. I was excited when she published her latest book, Leading from the Roots. She has been sharing excerpts from the book on her regular blogs. We asked if we could share one of her recent blogs to introduce you to Kathy, and it’s a must read blog. Enjoy.

 

 read more »

Designing Leadership Support/Development Approaches that are Race Conscious and Contribute to Racial Equity

Appreciation and update: First of all, a huge appreciation to the many folks who have been contributing to our collaborative work to create a useful and rich racial equity resource for folks who provide and fund leadership development. We are definitely smarter together as those of you who have watched and supported the development of this will have seen.  We would like to propose some next steps to current and new contributors (it's definitely not too late to help.)

 

Creating diagnostics: Ultimately, what we would like to do with this document is create a supporting online diagnostic tool to help programs understand where they may need to double down in their efforts to offer race conscious leadership supports that contribute to racial equity. The diagnostic tool could also serve to provide a snapshot of how strong a specific approach will be in contributing to racial equity for potential funders. You will see in each section we are now creating a checklist to lay the groundwork for a tool. Ultimately, we would like to organize the recommendations/resources we are aggregating and link them to the major areas of the diagnostics. For example, a low score on designing and delivering leadership supports would direct you to specific design recommendations and models.

 read more »

What would it look like to bring a Racial Equity Lens to Leadership Development?

What would it look like to bring a Racial Equity Lens to Leadership Development?

You can help us to answer this question!

 

A couple weeks ago, I was talking to a funder who asked me about tools and resources that would be useful to grantmakers and people designing leadership programs; people who want to ensure that programs contributing to racial equity are supported. I shared some of the resources that I knew of, and then it occurred to me….there are tons of smart people doing great work at the intersection of leadership and racial equity.

 read more »

LLC Webinar | Important Lessons for Cultivating Leadership of Color in Community Organizing

August 22, 2018

11:00 am Pacific - 12PM | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Eastern

 

 

Please join us for a conversation with Ericka Stallings from the Center for Neighborhood Leadership as she shares lessons from 10 years of experience about what makes an effective and transformative support model for developing indigenous community leadership. She will cover a lot of ground including learning from mistakes, intentional selection, working on real problems, putting in the time it takes, compensation, what it means to reclaim leadership and more. Her lessons are deeply rooted in the view that communities of color and other marginalized communities do not need external actors and have the wisdom and talents needed to take on complex problems with the appropriate supports. We hope you can join us for a thoughtful conversation that will help us to think differently about leadership development. If you would like to read a great blog post by Ericka in preparation for the webinar you can find it here.

 

Practicing What We Preach: The Co-Executive Director Model

I am excited to announce that we are beginning the search for a Co-Executive Director. It’s an idea that has been percolating in me for some time now, and for many reasons. As you may have noticed, the tagline for much of what we write is…”promoting equity-based, networked and collective leadership.” Obviously, if we want to debunk the heroic individualist model of leader in favor of more collectivist models of leadership as a process, it does not make sense to embody the ‘go it alone’ individual ED model, even though we are also trying to flatten out the hierarchy which also has to happen. We have been following the move by well respected colleagues in our field who have already made this move, MAG, Movement Building Project, Center for Movement Strategy, the Whitman Center and also coming on board CompassPoint. We have had a lot of conversations about this, and we are jumping into it with our eyes wide open about all that can be great, and all that could be challenging, so ... before going into the details, I want to spend more time on why this is so important.

 read more »

Six Lessons for Cultivating Leadership of Color in the Community Organizing Movement

By Ericka Stallings, ANHD's Director of Organizing and Advocacy

Non-profit organizing institutions have long struggled with the fact that their leadership is disproportionately white and middle class. We all know that our organizing will ultimately be more effective and more grounded in a true commitment to justice, if the primary actors are directly impacted people, those who come from the marginalized communities in which we work. Yet, for many reasons, groups in the Community Development movement too often fail to achieve this.

 

Cultivating movement leadership of color must include an effective approach for recognizing, attracting, and training new community organizers of color, then supporting them as they hone their skills to more advanced levels. But even here - or maybe, especially here - our movement falls short; we have seen that it is consistently difficult for people from marginalized communities to overcome the barriers to both entry and advancement in community organizing. Consequently, people of color and other marginalized people are grossly underrepresented in leadership positions . There are many reasons for this, including implicit bias and the glorification of mainstream career and educational backgrounds, both of which hinder the recognition of candidates from marginalized backgrounds. Consequently, our organizations often ignore or undervalue the critically important skills and experiences that directly-impacted leaders can bring to movement organizations.

 read more »

Vision, Hope and Liberation: Some Thoughts and Exercises for Visioning

Oddly, I don’t think I have written much about my own leadership development experience, which was profound on many levels. As I sat down to write about vision I found myself remembering two experiences as a participant in the Kellogg National Leadership Program that shaped my thinking and beliefs. The first was a week long, small seminar for 12 lucky fellows, self included, with Paulo Freire. His book, Pedagogy of the Oppressed was sacred text to me. I could write dozens of blog posts about that experience, but for the sake of focus I will go straight to one of many punchlines. On about day three, he walked over to me and kindly put his hand on my shoulder as he said, “Your problem is that you don’t dream.” He went on to explain that while power might change hands in the fight for justice, we will recreate systems oppressions without imagining a society in which we are able to reach our full humanity by liberating ourselves from oppressive relationships (either as oppressor or oppressed). read more »

Blind Spots (Part 3)

At Creating Space, Elissa Perry shared a framework on White Supremacy Culture from Tema Okun and Kenneth Jones as she invited us to reflect on the ways in which this culture shows up in our organizations. Since then, I have been thinking about how these characteristics are often the default in our leadership development practice as well. Today, I wanted to discuss the remaining characteristics which fall into two areas: how we value what we do, and how we address power and conflict.

 read more »

Response to "Blind Spots (Part 2)" by Lisa Miller Mattsson

Dear Deborah,

 

Thanks so much for the powerful theme and the questions being raised by “Blind Spots: Are Leadership Development Programs Contributing to Greater Racial Equality or Inhibiting our Progress?”  Lots to think about!

 

I just wanted to share a thought regarding “worship of the written word” as a means of support for white supremacist culture.  It is definitely true that there are many valuable and powerful ways to communicate other than in writing. Personally, I believe effective oration to be more a powerful form of leadership communication than writing, as a general rule.  Even negative leaders know this, and use the spoken word to move people.  Hitler, the iconic example of white supremacist leadership, comes to mind.  He utilized the power of the spoken word as a means by which to stir and mobilize people.

 read more »

Syndicate content